Overview

This section describes network configuration in more detail.

There are three network addresses to be determined. For each of these there is a section, below, which shows the priority of sources from which they are set in a table, and goes on to describe the different approaches to determining them.

Local network address

This is the address of the local machine where you are installing the MDK, and is stored in the environment variable MIRO_LOCAL_IP.

MIRO_LOCAL_IPIf this value is set when setup.bash runs, no further determination is performed.
MIRO_STATIC_IPIf MIRO_NETWORK_MODE is set to static, this value is used.
miro_get_dynamic_address()If MIRO_NETWORK_MODE is set to dynamic, the value returned by this function is used.
127.0.0.1If MIRO_NETWORK_MODE is set to loopback, this value is used.
127.0.0.1If none of the above sets a non-empty value into MIRO_LOCAL_IP, this value is used.

Most machines have only one network address—aka "IP address"—and it is this that must be determined and stored in MIRO_LOCAL_IP. Usually, MIRO_LOCAL_IP will be recovered correctly by the default configuration which relies on miro_get_dynamic_address().

Dynamic mode

The default value of MIRO_NETWORK_MODE is "dynamic". In this mode the network address is determined dynamically when setup.bash is run using the function miro_get_dynamic_address().

In the default implementation of this function (in setup.bash), the first qualifying IPv4 address listed by ifconfig is taken. If your system has more than one IPv4 address, and the first is not the one you intend to use, either provide your own implementation of miro_get_dynamic_address() (starting with the template in user_setup.bash) or use one of the other address determination modes ("static" or "loopback").

To provide your own implementation of miro_get_dynamic_address(), uncomment the version in user_setup.bash and modify it to correctly recover your local network address dynamically. Note that an uncommented function in user_setup.bash automatically overrides the one defined in setup.bash. The custom function should set the network address into MIRO_DYNAMIC_IP and then exit.

Static mode

If your network address is fixed, you can set MIRO_NETWORK_MODE to "static" and MIRO_STATIC_IP to the fixed address. For example:

~/.miro2/config/user_setup.bash
MIRO_NETWORK_MODE=static MIRO_STATIC_IP=192.168.1.100

Loopback address

If you do not need the network—for instance, you intend to use only the simulator—you can also use the "loopback" mode, which is equivalent to "static" mode with the network address set to 127.0.0.1.

~/.miro2/config/user_setup.bash
MIRO_NETWORK_MODE=loopback

Robot network address

This is the address of the robot with which you are working, and is stored in the environment variable MIRO_ROBOT_IP.

MIRO_ROBOT_IPIf this value is set when setup.bash runs, no further determination is performed.
<empty>MIRO_ROBOT_IP cannot be recovered automatically and is left empty if not specified.

Set this explicitly before you source ~/mdk/setup.bash if you want to work with a robot. See Off-board for more details.

If you are using the simulator, leave this blank, or ROS_MASTER_IP may be set incorrectly.

ROS master address

This is the address where the ROS master is running, and is stored in the environment variable ROS_MASTER_IP.

ROS_MASTER_IPIf this value is set when setup.bash runs, no further determination is performed.
MIRO_ROBOT_IPIf this value is not empty, it is used also as ROS_MASTER_IP.
localhostIf none of the above sets a non-empty value into ROS_MASTER_IP, this value is used.

Usually, you can leave setup.bash to configure this. If the above two values are set correctly, ROS_MASTER_IP will be set automatically to the local address (if using the simulator) or to the robot's address (if working with a robot).

If you want to use a specific ROS master, in either case, you can set this value explicitly before sourcing setup.bash.